Fun Activities to Do on an England Vacation

Where are you headed to this year? Are you considering an England vacation? If you do, then it is one of the most promising tours that you can ever have. Being on a vacation is indeed a memorable event for you and your family. So if you need you are going out of a rural area with good friends or with your relatives, there’s one vital thing that comes around and that is your trip will involve spending money. Yet, you don’t need to worry that often because whatever amount that goes out of your pocket is equaled by the most unforgettable enjoyment, fun, and thrill! When all said and done, England is such a vast place that the attractions therein are valued visiting.

Fun Things to Keep You Busy during Your Stay

Alright so you’re searching forward to your stay in England. Of course the best place to visit is the famous city of London. Here are the lid 10 activities that should make up your list.

Go to the British Museum. If you need or not you are a history bug, the British Museum will surely fascinate you. It houses more than fifteen million of artifacts so the visit will open your eyes to its rich historical accounts in addition to provide you with an instructive see. Its numerous collections are unlikely to fail to stimulate your mood and if you get tired, you can invariably head towards the museum caf.

Capture the wonder of London Bridge by dusk. Being the renowned London icons, the bridge itself stands majestically across the River Thames. The river flows peacefully even though there is a general traffic jam over the bridge. Take photos of it at dusk and you will definitely love the scenery!

See the Huge Ben and the Time piece Tower. The time piece tower is considered to be the biggest four-faced chiming time piece with a captivating structural design. The Huge Ben whereas is the gigantic bell that is in a clock tower.

See for yourself the changing of the Queens’ Guards. Be sure not to miss this opportunity of witnessing the changing of the guards at the Buckingham Palace.

Tour the Westminster Palace. If you head to London on the summertime, you can grab an opportunity of getting into the palace and hearing of its educational and historical commentaries.

Go shopping at Harrods. If you want you want to buy or simply look around, this shopping place is truly worth your time. In here you will likewise see the memorial sculptures of Dodi Al Fayed and Princess Diana.

Walk around Trafalgar Square. You may not be in a position to feed the pigeons as it has been already banned yet outdoors square provides a great place for using some kind of walk.

Pay homage to St. Paul’s Cathedral. The Gothic architecture have been destroyed by the fire in the year 1710 but it currently stands beautifully with fantastic facades. Do not forget to pass by its Whispering Gallery too.

Visit the London Eye. Take a full view of the city as you ride this Ferris Wheel.

Sit and marvel at Shakespeare’s Globe Theater. Plays and educational tours are offered therein so you could commemorate the historical essence of this place.

So, are you already up for the fun and adventure that an England vacation holds for you?

Church of England School

About one fourth of all primary schools in England are Church of England schools. Most British citizens believe that receiving and education from a CE School is important for children to be able to learn and develop a sense of what is right and wrong. Individuals also believe that these students will receive a finer education and evolve into a responsible member of their society.

There are three different categories of schools located throughout England. The first one is called voluntary aided; the school is owned by the church and the governing body of the church handles all school operations from appointing teachers to raising money to aid in the repairs of school buildings.

The second category is the voluntary controlled, where the school is owned by the church and it appoints its own overseers. However, the school board is not totally loaded with church members, and the teachers are not appointed by the church board. Rather the teachers are hired by the local education authority who also oversees any repairs to school buildings as needed. The last type is the foundation, where a foundation owns the school and the foundations board employs the teachers and other staff and oversees all school operations.

The Church of England is also in the first throes of a major expansion project, hoping to open over 100 additional schools. Currently as of 2004 approximately 25 of these schools had been opened with another 15 of them almost completed. Because of the popularity of catholic education, such expansion is possible and needed to provide the education for British children across that country.

The admission policy in England is pretty straight forward. The board will admit students of all faiths provided there is not a shortage of available spaces in the school system. If there is a shortage, preference will be given to students who are, of course, from the catholic faith, and then to students who have excellent academic records, and go on from there. In some locations, scholarships are available to the families of students who excel in academics but cannot afford to pay for a private education.

There are some myths of catholic education. For example many individuals do not believe that catholic schools educate children on the topic of sexual education. In fact, there are requirements that this topic is taught as part of each school’s science curriculum. The catholic school system has also been accused of not wanting to educate children who are of different faiths. That too is a myth. Of course, the church believes in the religious education of all children, particularly the catholic faith. However, children of all faith are welcome to the system, as are children who express no faith at all.

The catholic way of education has been founded in history in the country of England, going back to the legendary kings of England who were the heads of the Catholic Church. The catholic education of England’s children remains a very popular educational system.

Colin Baker and the Bilingual Education

Colin Baker is perhaps best known for being the author of a widely read textbook on bilingual education, Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, which has undergone four editions. The book has sold over 60,000 copies and has been translated into Japanese, Spanish, Latvian, Greek, and Mandarin.

For Baker, early experience was no predictor of his later career. Born on October 1, 1949, in Danbury, a hilltop village in southeastern England, he remembers only one bilingual person in that village. She was a Belgian refugee speaking French and English, considered by villagers as “different.” In elementary school, teachers and students were monolingual English speakers, matching his nuclear and extended family.

In high school, Baker learned Latin and French through the grammar-translation method. Conversational French was regarded as nonacademic and insufficient as a brain-developing activity; hence, it was largely avoided. All students were native English speakers and were required to use a prestigious variety called “the Queen’s English.”

Despite encouragement from his high school principal to attend a top English university, Baker’s main interest was walking mountains. Having traversed the highest peaks in England, he wished to walk the higher Welsh mountains. Bangor is located very near those mountains, and Bangor University became Baker’s home. The university overlooks a small city. The many surrounding villages are populated with bilinguals, with the great majority of the indigenous population speaking both Welsh and English fluently and some immigrants from England learning Welsh for employment or cultural enjoyment.

University students can take some humanities subjects through the medium of Welsh, and bilingual education is predominant in all elementary and most high schools. In this context, bilingualism is a natural topic for study. One of Baker’s tutors, W. R. Jones, was a world expert on the relationship between bilingualism and IQ and on empirical studies of the effectiveness of bilingual education. Jones also taught Baker advanced statistical analysis for his PhD, although Jones’ “teaching” mostly meant Baker’s self-teaching.

Thus, for young Baker, the foundations had been laid. Another event was probably more influential in precipitating a lifelong interest in studying bilingualism. As a freshman, Baker sang in a church choir and fell in love with his future wife across the choir stalls. Anwen was the daughter of the pastor of that church, and her family lived their lives speaking mostly Welsh. Students were warmly welcomed to the house, and Baker found a second home.

The seamless and effortless movement in that family between two languages, two literacies, and two cultures was in stark contrast to monolingual Danbury. The diversity and value-addedness of bilingualism became apparent and appealing. In years to come, it bore fruit in a thoroughly bilingual Baker household, with three children who were educated in two languages.