Church of England School

About one fourth of all primary schools in England are Church of England schools. Most British citizens believe that receiving and education from a CE School is important for children to be able to learn and develop a sense of what is right and wrong. Individuals also believe that these students will receive a finer education and evolve into a responsible member of their society.

There are three different categories of schools located throughout England. The first one is called voluntary aided; the school is owned by the church and the governing body of the church handles all school operations from appointing teachers to raising money to aid in the repairs of school buildings.

The second category is the voluntary controlled, where the school is owned by the church and it appoints its own overseers. However, the school board is not totally loaded with church members, and the teachers are not appointed by the church board. Rather the teachers are hired by the local education authority who also oversees any repairs to school buildings as needed. The last type is the foundation, where a foundation owns the school and the foundations board employs the teachers and other staff and oversees all school operations.

The Church of England is also in the first throes of a major expansion project, hoping to open over 100 additional schools. Currently as of 2004 approximately 25 of these schools had been opened with another 15 of them almost completed. Because of the popularity of catholic education, such expansion is possible and needed to provide the education for British children across that country.

The admission policy in England is pretty straight forward. The board will admit students of all faiths provided there is not a shortage of available spaces in the school system. If there is a shortage, preference will be given to students who are, of course, from the catholic faith, and then to students who have excellent academic records, and go on from there. In some locations, scholarships are available to the families of students who excel in academics but cannot afford to pay for a private education.

There are some myths of catholic education. For example many individuals do not believe that catholic schools educate children on the topic of sexual education. In fact, there are requirements that this topic is taught as part of each school’s science curriculum. The catholic school system has also been accused of not wanting to educate children who are of different faiths. That too is a myth. Of course, the church believes in the religious education of all children, particularly the catholic faith. However, children of all faith are welcome to the system, as are children who express no faith at all.

The catholic way of education has been founded in history in the country of England, going back to the legendary kings of England who were the heads of the Catholic Church. The catholic education of England’s children remains a very popular educational system.